World governments object to new net names

Posted on November 27, 2012

 

Over 250 objections, by states across the world, have been raised against the new net names, planned for a roll out next year.

The Government Advisory Committe (Gac), which represents many of the world’s governments, has published an “early warning” list, outlining its collective concerns. It is aimed at allowing applicants the chance to address the objections.

Gac will then make a decision in April as to what suffixes to pursue further action against.

Applicants can also withdraw their submission to the name, but will only qualify for 80 per cent of their $185,000 (£116,300) application fee.

The list of suffixes includes those covering many sectors and cultures, such as .africa, .casino and .islam. The suffix .search, wanted by Google, also appears on the list, though interestingly, .seo was not applied for by anyone.

Westminster has made just one objection, to the suffix .rugby.

Two applicants have requested it, in addition to the International Rugby Board. The UK has objected against the two former requests, proposing the IRB bid be favoured.

There are a number of major corporations who’s applications have been objected against. As well as its .search, application, Google has concerns raised against a number of others. Much the same is true for Amazon and Symantec.

Throughout the world, many reasons are given for the objections. Largely focussing on issues in regards to fair business and other commercial concerns, few countries are not represented.

Despite the length of the list though, Icann still expects to release the first suffixes in May 2013.

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