Web Development:

How image compression can speed up or slow down your site

Posted on September 22, 2020

Uploading images to websites may sound simple, but don’t underestimate the opportunity to be had if technology is leveraged to optimise your website. (more…)

Posted by Carl Hopkinson

Five essential plugins for any website

Posted on September 21, 2020

There are over 55,000 free plugins available from the WordPress Plugins directory, and countless premium tools too. For a person new to the content management system, it can be (more…)

Posted by Carl Hopkinson

WordPress Divi theme compromised

Posted on August 10, 2020

Researchers at WordFence have recently discovered a security weakness in WordPress’ Elegant Themes Divi, the Divi Builder plugin and Extra themes.

What is the vulnerability?

In essence, this vulnerability allows users with either editing or publishing authorisation to upload harmful files onto a site. In order to do so, a user’s login would first have to be compromised – assuming that (more…)

Posted by Emily Jones

Three steps to a pandemic-proof website

Posted on June 8, 2020

Having the right web design is important at any time, but in today’s world, as lockdown is lifting and businesses start to trade again, customers are cautious and want reassurance about where (more…)

Posted by Lianne Wilkinson

How your website could LITERALLY save your business

Posted on April 22, 2020

We may be in a form of lockdown in the UK, with many businesses closing their doors for the foreseeable future, but there are still opportunities to be found out there. This applies to (more…)

Posted by Darren Jamieson

How to use HTML H tags on blogs

Posted on April 8, 2020

When writing a blog, especially a feature or guide that goes over 500 words, using subheadings often helps to make your writing more structured and presentable.

A beginner to HTML-based content management systems like WordPress might not know how to do this and might make the subtitles and paragraphs all appear in the same size and font. Others with a little more experience might put their subheadings in bold or italic letters, which at least makes it more pleasing to the eye, but the best technique is to master H tags.

When I was first introduced to the idea of H tags, my misunderstanding was to think that they were simply another way of making subheadings stand out from the rest of the writing, just like typing in a bigger, bolder font or underlining text. They do achieve this, but they also have positive search engine optimisation effects.

What are H tags?

H tags (the ‘H’ stands for ‘Header’) are ways of indicating the importance of your headings, and they range from <h1> to <h6>. They help to format the piece and make it easier to read, but they also aid search engines in making sense of the content. In 2015, Google Webmaster Trends Analyst John Mueller confirmed:

“We do use H tags to understand the structure of the text on a page better.”

That alone means there is more value in using these tags that simply printing subheadings in bigger or bolder fonts. If your subheadings take the form of questions and are tagged appropriately, there’s more chance of Google returning your page in a search for that question, and perhaps featuring it in its Snippets.

Why are there six H tags?

The numbers indicate hierarchy. They dictate the importance of the header and how prominently it will be displayed.

The most prominent and important is <h1> and that will be your title. A page should only have one <h1> tag, whereas the others can in theory be used as many times as you like.

Most blogs will only include an <h1> tag for the main title, and <h2> tags for any subheadings. The above subheading, for example, is written in HTML as <h2>Why are there six H tags?</h2>.

There may be times when you want a subheading with several smaller subheadings underneath it. On these occasions, you can use <h3> tags. For example, if your <h2> tag was “What animals might you see on a farm?”, you might want to have subheaded paragraphs underneath this about ‘Cows’, ‘Sheep’, ‘Ducks’ and so on. Each of these could be an <h3>.

Perhaps under ‘Cows’, you might want to mention ‘Frisian cows’ and ‘Highland cows’, so each of them could be an <h4>. I don’t think I’ve ever gone any further than <h4> myself, but you can keep carrying this pattern down to <h6>. This may have its purposes if you’re writing something where detailed instructions are required, such as a user guide.

Can you use an <h3> tag without an <h2>?

This is not recommended. It will look fine on the page, but Google and other search engines won’t understand the hierarchy of your headings if you skip <h2>. Some bloggers and website owners complain that their <h2> tags appear too big on the page, but if this is the case, it’s best to ask your web designer to change it for you than to go straight from <h1> to <h3> or <h4>.

To get the best out of your blog, both from an aesthetic and SEO perspective, why not speak to us at Engage Web?

Posted by John Murray

Don’t miss out as consumer spending shifts online

Posted on March 27, 2020

Two studies are showing that, perhaps unsurprisingly, consumers are spending more money online as the COVID-19 outbreak takes hold, emphasising the need for businesses to have an online presence.

Here in the UK, research from Blacktower Financial Management Group indicates that households have been spending an average of £13 more per week during the pandemic. Some of this has been in physical supermarkets, but notably, online spending has gone up by 25.5%.

Another study reveals similar patterns in the US, where restrictions are currently a little more relaxed in most states than they are here. A survey of over 2,500 American adults by L.E.K. Consulting and Civis reveals that online spending is up by 10%-30%, despite pessimism about the economy with 80%-90% of respondents believing a recession is likely next year.

As sanctions on personal movement increase both in the UK and the US (the latter has today been confirmed to have more coronavirus cases than any other country), these figures are only likely to increase as we become more reliant on home delivery services. This makes it crucial that businesses, particularly retailers, can continue to operate online for as long as restrictions continue.

Yesterday, we discussed how setting up a basic brochure website can make a big difference by giving traditional small brick-and-mortar stores an internet presence. With that structure in place, there’s no limit to how far they can take their online retail services, leaving them well set up for a post-coronavirus future.

The internet will no doubt prove to be a crucial lifeline as the pandemic develops and, while the situation is creating unprecedented challenges for businesses, many might be finding that funds they had put aside for something else have now been freed up. This might be due to cancelled events, unneeded office supplies or delayed plans to recruit staff, so why not invest some of this money into digital marketing and web development?

Whether the idea of a website is new to you, or you have one but want to get more out of it, speak to us at Engage Web for expert advice.

Posted by John Murray

Six reasons your website may not be getting any leads

Posted on January 23, 2020

If you’re not currently getting any business through your website, there could be any number of reasons why. Before you go spending money on a possible solution you may have read about on a blog, on social media, or (more…)

Posted by Darren Jamieson
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