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Content creation on the rise on LinkedIn

Posted on July 2, 2020

Business networking site LinkedIn has seen a surge in content creation, with content consumption and engagement between its users also seeing an increase compared to the same period of last year.

According to (more…)

Posted by Alan Littler

Three common questions about using quotes in online writing

Posted on June 18, 2020

If you look at just about any news story, you will probably see a quote from somebody in it. News often comes from what people say and do, so to use their exact words is the most accurate way to report on this.

Not everyone is comfortable using other people’s words rather than their own though, so here are (more…)

Posted by John Murray

It’s time journalists learned the difference between England and the UK

Posted on May 21, 2020

Yesterday, I saw an article that reminded me of a common misunderstanding displayed even by trained writers and journalists – we don’t understand the country we live in. Misuse of the terms ‘England’, ‘Britain’ and ‘UK’ is causing misinformation to thrive, and statistics to be either manipulated or just plain wrong.

The piece in question was by (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Government wants your COVID-19 risk assessment on your website

Posted on May 12, 2020

Yesterday, the Gov.uk website published its latest guidance to employers on getting the country safely back to work. This includes five “key points” employers should address as soon as is practically possible, and one of them in particular stood out to us.

Point 2 sets out the need for employers to carry out a risk assessment, and to (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Three actionable ways to make your content Google update-proof

Posted on May 7, 2020

Google has performed another of its core updates this week. As always, only Google itself knows exactly what this entails, and the ramifications of it will not be immediately apparent, so it can be difficult for site owners to know how to react to this news.

The search engine doesn’t give unique advice on each (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Three tips for business blogging during COVID-19

Posted on April 29, 2020

The pandemic has affected businesses in varying ways, but what almost all have in common is that they have had to adapt and do things differently.

For some, that’s meant furloughing workers, while others have pivoted and found new ways to drive business in unfamiliar times. This might have meant taking offline services online, or going (more…)

Posted by John Murray

How to use HTML H tags on blogs

Posted on April 8, 2020

When writing a blog, especially a feature or guide that goes over 500 words, using subheadings often helps to make your writing more structured and presentable.

A beginner to HTML-based content management systems like WordPress might not know how to do this and might make the subtitles and paragraphs all appear in the same size and font. Others with a little more experience might put their subheadings in bold or italic letters, which at least makes it more pleasing to the eye, but the best technique is to master H tags.

When I was first introduced to the idea of H tags, my misunderstanding was to think that they were simply another way of making subheadings stand out from the rest of the writing, just like typing in a bigger, bolder font or underlining text. They do achieve this, but they also have positive search engine optimisation effects.

What are H tags?

H tags (the ‘H’ stands for ‘Header’) are ways of indicating the importance of your headings, and they range from <h1> to <h6>. They help to format the piece and make it easier to read, but they also aid search engines in making sense of the content. In 2015, Google Webmaster Trends Analyst John Mueller confirmed:

“We do use H tags to understand the structure of the text on a page better.”

That alone means there is more value in using these tags that simply printing subheadings in bigger or bolder fonts. If your subheadings take the form of questions and are tagged appropriately, there’s more chance of Google returning your page in a search for that question, and perhaps featuring it in its Snippets.

Why are there six H tags?

The numbers indicate hierarchy. They dictate the importance of the header and how prominently it will be displayed.

The most prominent and important is <h1> and that will be your title. A page should only have one <h1> tag, whereas the others can in theory be used as many times as you like.

Most blogs will only include an <h1> tag for the main title, and <h2> tags for any subheadings. The above subheading, for example, is written in HTML as <h2>Why are there six H tags?</h2>.

There may be times when you want a subheading with several smaller subheadings underneath it. On these occasions, you can use <h3> tags. For example, if your <h2> tag was “What animals might you see on a farm?”, you might want to have subheaded paragraphs underneath this about ‘Cows’, ‘Sheep’, ‘Ducks’ and so on. Each of these could be an <h3>.

Perhaps under ‘Cows’, you might want to mention ‘Frisian cows’ and ‘Highland cows’, so each of them could be an <h4>. I don’t think I’ve ever gone any further than <h4> myself, but you can keep carrying this pattern down to <h6>. This may have its purposes if you’re writing something where detailed instructions are required, such as a user guide.

Can you use an <h3> tag without an <h2>?

This is not recommended. It will look fine on the page, but Google and other search engines won’t understand the hierarchy of your headings if you skip <h2>. Some bloggers and website owners complain that their <h2> tags appear too big on the page, but if this is the case, it’s best to ask your web designer to change it for you than to go straight from <h1> to <h3> or <h4>.

To get the best out of your blog, both from an aesthetic and SEO perspective, why not speak to us at Engage Web?

Posted by John Murray

Four tips for writing product pages

Posted on March 10, 2020

If you use your website to sell anything, it’s important to have high-quality, descriptive text to go alongside images of the products. Although they say a picture tells a thousand words, you still need to complement images with written copy so that readers can fully understand what an item does. Plus, of course, search engines rely (more…)

Posted by John Murray
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