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Engage Web September 2017 - Engage Web

Beware of that “someone who’ll do it cheaper”

Posted on September 29, 2017

I’m sure everyone’s seen the internet meme of the tattoo ‘artist’ having a bash at tattooing a winged horse on someone’s back. You’ve not seen it? No problem, here it is just for you.

OK, so now you get the idea. This sets things up nicely for my impending rant.

A client recently decided to move their website from Engage Web to a cheaper hosting company. There’s nothing wrong with that, we don’t charge to move your website away from us and there are a lot of people offering web hosting cheaper than us.

Keep that meme in your mind now!

We gave the new web hosting company the access they needed to move the website, and we transferred the domain to the new registrar specified by their new hosting company. This was done by changing the IPS tag for the domain name to the one used by their new registrar. This may sound a bit techy, but it simply means it releases the domain to a different registrar so it’s now controlled by them.

Anyhow, three weeks passed by and the website still hadn’t been moved. We contacted the client, and their new hosting company, to remind them that their current hosting would expire over the weekend and the website would need to be moved as the data would be removed from our server on Monday morning.

This was quickly followed by an email from their new hosting company – an email that did not copy in the client. They asked if we could change the IPS tag on the domain name to something else, something different to the one they’d asked for three weeks previously.

It’s at this point I’m going to stop calling them a hosting company, and instead refer to them as ‘some bloke who’ll do it cheaper’.

I replied to some bloke who’ll do it cheaper and explained to him that, actually, we can’t change the IPTS tag on the domain as he’s requested as we no longer have access to do so. We released the domain to the registrar he asked for three weeks earlier. It is no longer with us.

You can probably guess what happened next.

The weekend came and went, and the website’s files were removed from our server on Monday morning. The site had not been moved by some bloke who’ll do it cheaper, so the website went down. Not only had it not been moved, but he hadn’t even accessed the website to download the files and database. No, instead he emailed us on the Monday and asked if we still had a copy of the website, as he didn’t have one.

Once again, he didn’t copy in the client.

I replied to let him know that we could restore a backup from the server, but we would have to charge for this as the hosting had expired, and would mean setting the hosting account back up in order to restore the backup, before giving him access once again.

He didn’t reply. The client’s website has not been restored. The bloke who’ll do it cheaper has, instead, put up a blank WordPress website for them.

There is always someone willing to do something cheaper, but you really should steer clear of them because there’s often a very good reason why they’re cheaper. It’s usually because they have no idea what they’re doing.

Incidentally this bloke who’s willing to do it cheaper has a website of his own. He doesn’t advertise himself as a web designer or developer, instead he classes himself as ‘IT’. Someone in IT who doesn’t know how a domain transfer works, or how to backup data before a hosting account is deleted? I certainly won’t be recommending him to any clients.

 

Posted by Darren Jamieson

Twitter trials tweeting with twice as many characters

Posted on September 28, 2017

Twitter’s 140-character tweet limit has long been a source of both entertainment and frustration for its users.

It can be immensely annoying when you don’t quite have the room to say what you wanted to, leading to criticism that the social media site promotes an overly blunt ‘soundbite’ style of writing rather than an expressive one. At the same time though, it’s (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Can the internet stimulate all five senses?

Posted on September 27, 2017

When we use the internet, we’re only actually making use of two of our five senses of perception. Obviously, sight is one of them, with the screens full of text, images and videos we subject ourselves to, and internet use is often an audible experience too, especially if we’re on music streaming tools like Spotify or iTunes.

However, this still leaves (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Tech firms dominate latest brand value report

Posted on September 26, 2017

The world’s most valuable brands list has been updated and it has revealed that companies based in the technology sector now make up half of the top 10.

The list was compiled by Interbrand, as part of its annual Best Global Brands report, which has now been going close to 20 years. This year’s report, released on September 25, was the 18th edition of the report.

This year’s list shows that technology is the most dominant sector, with Apple securing top spot on the list for the fifth consecutive year. The brand value of Apple increased by 3% on last year to $184.2bn (£136.3bn).

Rankings are based on three different components that contribute to a brand’s total value: the financial performance of the brand’s products and services, the role the brand plays in influencing the choices of consumers and the strength it has to command premium prices or to secure earnings.

In second place in the report was search giant Google, which also retained its position for a fifth straight year. Google’s brand value increased by 6% this year, to $141.7bn (£104.9bn), closing the gap on Apple.

Microsoft rose to third place this year, overtaking Coca-Cola, which was the only food/drink company in the top 10. Microsoft’s brand value rose to $79.9bn (£59.1bn), which is a 10% jump on last year, whereas Coca-Cola saw a 5% decrease to $69.7bn (£51.5bn). Only Coca-Cola and Toyota from the top 10 saw a drop in brand value from last year’s figures.

For the first time, social media site Facebook entered the top 10, climbing the ranks to reach eighth place. The California-based company saw the biggest growth over the last 12 months of any brand in the top 100, seeing its brand value rise 48% to $48.2bn (£35.6bn).

After Facebook, the next biggest percentages of growth came from Amazon (33%), LEGO (25%) and Nissan (22%).

The top 10 is below:

1. Apple
2. Google
3. Microsoft
4. Coca-Cola
5. Amazon
6. Samsung
7. Toyota
8. Facebook
9. Mercedes-Benz
10. IBM

The whole list can be seen here.

New entrants to the top 100 this year included Netflix (78th), Salesforce.com (84th) and Ferrari (88th). In total, the top 100 brands have a combined total value of $1,872bn (£1,385bn), which represents a 4.2% rise on the figures from 2016.

Despite technology being dominant at the top, it is the automotive industry that has the most brands featured in the top 100, with a total of 16 entrants.

Posted by Alan Littler

Microsoft subsea cable hits latest milestone

Posted on September 25, 2017

Three tech giants have hit the latest target in their subsea cable link project that is said to be 16 million times faster than regular broadband.

Microsoft, Telefonica and Facebook are (more…)

Posted by Alan Littler

Instagram testing changes to popular app

Posted on September 22, 2017

It has been reported that popular photo-sharing platform Instagram is currently testing a couple of tweaks to the format of the app.

The first change currently in (more…)

Posted by Alan Littler

Who are the most dangerous celebrities to Google, and why?

Posted on September 21, 2017

The showbiz-obsessed cyber-geek might take great enjoyment in tapping away at a keyboard to find out what their favourite stars are up to, but a study has shown that there are some big names whose search results pose more of a risk than others.

Security software company McAfee is aware of how cyber criminals try to (more…)

Posted by John Murray

Study links cyberbullying with narcissism

Posted on September 20, 2017

It’s often said that bullies only act the way they do because they are unhappy with themselves, but a new study has drawn a link between those with very high opinions of themselves and the tendency to use social media for antisocial means.

The study was put together by researchers from The University of London and Brunel University London, and looked at (more…)

Posted by John Murray
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